Archive | Teaching Resources

A Topical Guide to Materials for Teaching New Jersey History

The following guide begins with an brief essay by David Steven Cohen on Why Teach New Jersey History. The guide itself is divided into two parts. Part I is organized by topics and includes materials suitable for use in kindergarten through fourth grade. Part II is organized chronologically and by topic. Each topic is subdivided […]

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New Jersey History Partnership Project

The following interactive, multimedia website was produced by the New Jersey History Partnership Project, a collaboration of the Montville Township School District, Kean University, and the New Jersey Historical Commission. Funded by a Teaching American History grant from the U.S. Department of Education, it is intended for middle and high school students. The website contains […]

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New Jersey Legacy

The goals of New Jersey Legacy are to reach a broad audience with high-quality television programs about New Jersey history. To place New Jersey history in the context of American and world history; to show how a knowledge of the past helps us understand the present; To incorporate women’s history, African–American history, ethnic history, and […]

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New Teaching Resources Now Posted

Two new teaching resources are now available. Teach the history of one of New Jersey’s edible innovations, Campbell Soup. This teaching resource comes with a Microsoft Power Point presentation of vintage company photographs. Woodrow Wilson played an important role in New Jersey’s history. This teaching resource features New Jersey’s 34th governor and his thoughts regarding […]

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Women at Work: Rosie The Riveter and World War II Teaching Resource (Target Age: Middle/High School)

Teaching resources featuring “Rosie the Riveter” are now available that focus on women’s role in World War II. The fictional character represented the quintessential female worker: loyal, efficient, and patriotic. A song entitled “Rosie the Riveter” became very popular in 1942. Norman Rockwell’s image on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on May 29, […]

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